Category Archives: hormones

Could HCG Diet Result in Unexpected Pregnancy?


I have written several blogs on the possible complications of using HCG for dieting. Of the problems HCG could cause I included excess facial and body hair, acne, oily skin, ovarian cysts and now I add unexpected pregnancy. It is important to remember that HCG has, for many years, been an important hormone in fertility treatments. During fertility treatments HCG is injected at a precise moment to cause release of the ripened egg, the process called ovulation.

A similar effect of HCG treatment could cause women who normally don’t ovulate to suddenly and unexpectedly release an egg. In essence, women on HCG injections for dieting are actually participating in their own fertility treatments.

Continue reading

Slow Acceptance by Doctors of Combination Treatment for Hypothyroidism


Mainstream endocrinologists seem to be moving grudgingly toward acceptance of combination T4 plus T3 therapy for hypothyroidism. A great example of the mixed feelings harbored by endocrinologists in this regard is the title of a recent editorial, “ Combo (treatment) a Last Resort for Hypothyroidism” . Although the author, Dr. Bruce Jancin of the University of Colorado, recognized the value of combination T4 plus T3 therapy, he did so with the least possible enthusiasm. In his article the doctor acknowledged the weakness of scientific studies showing negative results with combination therapy and pointed out the findings of the Watts Study which provides a genetic rationale for why some people need to have T3 added to T4 to return to proper thyroid hormone balance. Continue reading

HCG for Diet Could Effect Your Ovaries


Several months ago I posted my thoughts on possible hormonal complications of using HCG for diet purposes . Since HCG is the “pregnancy hormone” it has a profound effect on the ovaries, causing them to work harder with the potential to over produce various sex hormones. Based on this theory I proposed that HCG could make you hairy by raising levels of the hormone testosterone. Today I had confirmation of my suspicions about ovarian side effects of HCG injections for weight loss. I learned that a woman who was being treated for a thyroid condition and polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) developed a dangerous ovarian condition while using HCG for weight loss. She was happy because she lost 14 lbs. but was stopped by her GYN doctor from continuing her HCG injections. Continue reading

Richard Faces Frustration Finding Treatment for Hypothyroidism After Thyroid Cancer


I thought Richards comments about the battle he faces getting treatment for hypothyroidism after having his thyroid removed for cancer, would be of interest to many readers at metabolism.com.
Richard writes:

I recently ordered Thyroid-S on Amazon.com and after all the research and apparently good results I have found online, I think I made the right choice. I had my thyroid removed because of cancer in 2005, took Cytomel at first, felt great, told to stop cytomel and start Levothyroxine, felt horrible. Two months out(125mcg) TSH was 43.0, increased dose to 137mcg wait another 2 months, TSH was 31.0 Finally told to take 200mcg and TSH started to come down. It took about 6 months to get my TSH where they wanted it and for the side effects I was given all types of medications. Continue reading

Eric, Metabolism.com member, explains why T4 only doesn’t work


A long time member of metabolism.com, Eric Pritchard, has been a determined critic of “T4 only” treatment of hypothyroidism.  In his latest comment Eric shows that scientists were aware of the inadequacy of “T4 only” treatment since 1947!  I wanted to give everyone a chance to read his comment so I am posting to the main blog. Thanks again for your insight Eric.

Eric writes:

Endocrinologists have a hard time with the symptoms of hypothyroidism in the same sort of way that New York City folks believing that there is anything worthwhile west of the Hudson River. However, there are very relevant functions to the thyroid hormone effectiveness that exist beyond the boundaries of the classical endocrine system. This potential was given initial credence by Drs. Kirk and Kvroning in 1947 when they published a note saying that not all patients’ symptoms were managed by thyroxine (T4). This was collaborated in 1954 by Dr. Means. Drs. Gross and Pitt-Rivers discovered triiodothyronine (T3) and found it far more active than T4, which is now called a pro-hormone. The concept of euthyroid (your thyroid is OK) hypometabolism (but you are dragging anyway) was demonstrated by Dr. Goldberg in 1960. Drs. Refetoff and Braverman, circa 1970, discovered the connections between the thyroid gland and symptom producing cells, namely the cellular reception of hormones and the conversion of T4 to T3 outside of the endocrine system, which produces 80% of the body’s requirement for the active hormone, T3.

Another issue that is dismissed is the necessity of supporting chemistry to function properly. For example, every thyroid hormone replacement counter-indicates is use if the adrenals are insufficient.

So there is far more going on than endocrinology is willing to promote. That is why there are 1.7 million patients suffering in spite of T4 therapy. That is why there are still more patients suffering from false negative diagnoses for the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

 

 

Why Emotions Trigger Food Cravings


The old saying, “The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach” implies there is a deep connection between emotions and eating. My guess is  no one is really surprised by this idea. Both men and woman can identify ways in which their mood and appetite are intertwined and it is no mere quirk of man’s personality that this is true.

Evolution tells us that we were born to eat. The earliest creatures in the world’s history were simple eating machines. Their bodies consisted of an entrance for food, a digestive tract and an exit for refuse. In order to become more efficient at getting food creatures developed a system to locate food and to move toward it. This system is known as a nervous system. The first creature to have this ability is the worm. Eventually the nervous system controlling the digestive system (enteric nervous system) began to sprout nodes which were early brains.  As time went on and the brain became better developed it split off from the nervous system that controlled the digestive tract. Everything that followed in evolution, has served the purpose of developing  increasingly efficient brains (central nervous system) for acquiring the fuel of life.

Another example of how deeply connected the gut and brain are, is to look at the development of the fetus. When a human fetus is still just a lump of jelly, the digestive  and nervous systems are one structure. Soon this organ splits into two, one to become our gastrointestinal tract and the other the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). Even though they become physically separated the chemical signals used by the gut and nervous system remain virtually identical. These chemicals comprise the groups known as neurotransmitters and hormones.

The same chemicals in the digestive tract that cause the intestines to twist and convulse (peristalsis), in the brain stimulate the emotion of anxiety. This explains why people get “butterflies” in the stomach or diarrhea when they are nervous.  The brain chemicals involved in depression can cause constipation.  The syndrome of irritable bowel disease (IBS) with its cycles of diarrhea and constipation is thought to be a reflection of an emotional rollercoaster.  The chemical relationship between mood and appetite is even more complex but no less real. One of the most common side effect of mood altering drugs is increased appetite and weight gain. Just ask anyone who has been on an anti-depressant drug such as Prozac, Zoloft or Abilify.  The chemical in marihuana that gets people high is famous for triggering the eating binge called “the munchies”.

Appetite suppressant drugs often have effects on mood and can be the source of major side effects. One new generation of appetite suppressants being developed, Acomplia, failed to be approved by the FDA because it caused severe depression and suicidal thinking.

In the next part of this series we will look at ways we can influence the brain to control our appetite.

Should You be Concerned About Your Cortisol Level and What Can You Do About it?


Many members at metabolism.com have expressed concern that their cortisol level is either too high or too low. I thought it would be helpful to highlight the latest exchange I  had on the subject.

Mohammed writes:

Hello:   My overall dhea and cortisol levels are ok but cortisol is a little high what can i take to stabilise the level of cortisol, i know reducing stress and exercise e.t.c but i mean in terms of products is there anything that can balance cortisol, because i am suffering from low t3 and i know without good adrenal fnx
thyroid supplemts wont be as effective

My reply:

As you know the adrenal gland produces a hormone that is vital to survival known as cortisol, cortisone, or glucocorticoid. You are correct that during stress the adrenal will produce more cortisol which helps prepare the body for aggressive activity or injury. When the stress is relieved cortisol levels return to normal. Excess of cortisol causes a disorder known as Cushing’s Syndrome and a deficiency is called Addison’s Disease or adrenal insufficiency. Both of these disorders can cause illnesses serious enough to result in death. Fortunately cortisol excess or insufficiency is very rare and when diagnosed in time can be controlled. Several years ago there was an unethical company marketing a product called Cortislim which they claimed reduced cortisol levels to induce healthy weight loss. This product was removed from the market. As far as I’m concerned there is no legitimate product that will safely reduce cortisol levels, nor should there be. The body regulates production of cortisol very carefully because it is such a potent hormone with potential to help and harm in major ways. I believe you would be safer letting your body decide what your cortisol level should be rather than trying to do it yourself. You can check out another of my blogs on the subject of adrenal function. My book Metabolism.com includes a section where I review the controversy about adrenal fatigue as well.

Hope this information helps.

Thanks

Dr. P