Category Archives: Armour

Introducing The Thyroid Project


By metabolism.com

The mission of the The Thyroid Project is to encourage sharing of information and experience between the public and the medical community about the treatment of hypothyroidism (low thyroid function). For at least the past few decades there is a growing awareness of “something missing” in the way suffers of hypothyroidism are treated for their disease. Too many patients, as documented in an on-line study of 12,000 individuals conducted by the American Thyroid Association published in June 2018, (https://doi.org/10.1089/thy.2017.0681) , complain of persistent symptoms of hypothyroidism despite what their doctors believe is successful treatment with levothyroxine (brands include Synthroid, Unithroid, Tirosent, Levoxl). We believe something needs to be done to resolve this conflict between patients and their doctors. Continue reading

The American Thyroid Association clarifies public dissatisfaction with treatment of hypothyroidism.


By Metabolism.com

For decades doctors have recognized synthetic thyroid hormone known as levothyroxine or brand name Synthroid, as the undisputed choice for treating hypothyroidism (low thyroid function). By virtue of hypothyroidism being extremely common levothyroxine has been the most prescribed medication in the U.S.. According to key medical organizations in this country, the only acceptable treatment of hypothyroidism is the use of levothyroxine alone. Using any other form of therapy is not recommended.  Pointing to a significant number of patients receiving levothyroxine who continue to complain of symptoms of hypothyroidism health advocates have been calling for recognition of alternative treatments. One such alternative with a small but enthusiastic following  is extract of pig thyroid (desiccated thyroid extract).  All of the major organization of endocrinologists fail to recommend this form of treatment but in particular the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist or AACE in the US has flatly stated this form of therapy should never be used. Physicians and their patients remain deeply divided on this issue. Continue reading

If Hypothyroid and Unhappy, Which Came First?


If Hypothyroid and Unhappy, Which Came First?

By Gary Pepper, M.D.

Sad LadyMedical specialists increasingly accept that some patients being treated for hypothyroidism continue to be symptomatic and “unhappy”. The degree to which patients experience this problem while on conventional treatment for hypothyroidism with levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, Unithroid, T4) has motivated many specialists to look for other approaches to treatment such as adding T3 (Cytomel, liothyronine) or switching to desiccated thyroid extract (Armour, WPthyroid, Westhroid

Not all experts are convinced looking for new treatment options for hypothyroidism is the right approach. Continue reading

Make Your Opinion Count About Treatment Options for Hypothyroidism


Here is a rare opportunity to let the leadership in endocrinology know how you feel about treatment options for hypothyroidism. The American Thyroid Association is asking all those being treated for hypothyroidism to complete a simple questionnaire which will provide feedback regarding your level of satisfaction with present options for treatment of hypothyroidism. If you want to have your opinion counted log on to the following site and complete the survey!

If the link above doesn’t work copy and paste the following URL into your browser https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hypothyroidpatientsurvey

Wall Street Journal Reporter Helps Bring Clarity to Thyroid Treatment Controversy


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On April 11, 2016 an article, Doctors Hear Patients’ Calls for New Approaches to Hypothyroidism, appeared in the Wall Street Journal regarding the growing influence of patient preference on treatment selection for hypothyroidism (sluggish thyroid). The article was written by the WSJ health columnist Melinda Beck. I might have missed it but thanks to a motivated patient I received a copy within a week after its publication.  With a glance I knew this report could be a highly significant addition in the on-going debate between specialists treating hypothyroidism (endocrinologists) and advocates of alternative approaches. Continue reading

Join the Petition to Save Armour Thyroid


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Armour Thyroid, used successfully to treat hypothyroidism for over 100 years, offers patients unique benefits not seen with synthetic thyroid preparations. Forest Labs, which has been the maker of Armour for many decades is about to be merged with Pfizer. Pfizer already manufacturers a synthetic thyroid hormone product, Levoxyl. Pharmaceutical industry dynamics require that in this type of merger the weaker of two competing products, in this case Armour,  will be eliminated without hesitation. Without Armour Thyroid the health and well being of many thousands will be jeopardized.

Join us in petitioning the responsible corporate executives to preserve the supply of Armour Thyroid to these vulnerable individuals.

http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/continued-supply-of-armour-thyroid

 

 

Can a Blood Test Identify Those Who Need T3 for Proper Treatment of Hypothyroidism?


Dr. Gary Pepper and Dr. Paul Aoun discuss recent findings about thyroid hormone treatment at the 15th International Thyroid Congress

Dr. Gary Pepper and Dr. Paul Aoun discuss recent findings about thyroid hormone treatment at the 15th International Thyroid Congress

By Gary Pepper, M.D.

According to experts, 10 to 20% of hypothyroid individuals fail to respond completely to T4-only (levothyroxine, Synthroid) treatment. Dr. Anthony Bianco, the president of the American Thyroid Association, and his associates believe this is due to genetic variations in the way thyroid hormone is converted in the body from T4 into T3. T3 is the much more potent form of thyroid hormone and unless the cells of the body receive enough T3, normal function cannot be achieved and symptoms of low thyroid such as fatigue, mental fogginess, constipation, muscle aches etc, persist. Based on the research conducted by Dr. Bianco and colleagues it is thought that in those with the genetic trait making T4 treatment ineffective, blood tests would show low T3 levels. Continue reading