Tag Archives: medication

Petition to Protect Armour Thyroid Surpasses Goal


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“I have been on Armour Thyroid for 15 years and it has changed my life. For three years prior I was on synthetic thyroid medication and I felt horrible. My doctor even tried a medication that was specifically for T4 so I could get what I was missing. I was having such horrible migraines. Now I am doing so much better. I know how physically traumatic it is to adjust thyroid medication or to go without it and it can be life threatening for certain individuals. Like myself. People are individuals not objects and they have different reactions to some medications. There are a group of people who desperately need to continue taking Armour please do not substitute the ingredients or take it off the market. I feel the adjustments that have been made in the medication since Armour was taken off of the market for almost a year. I had to resort to buying my medication from Canada!

Quote from Kathleen, a signer of the petition to Ensure Continued Supply of Armour; Read over 125 comments from other Armour supporters at ipetitions.com

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Armour Thyroid, the most popular form of desiccated thyroid hormone replacement in the U.S., has been the center of controversy for decades in the medical community. Despite over 100 years of successful use, the major endocrine specialty organization in the U.S. called for a prohibition on its use. Medicare dropped its coverage of this medication in 2008.  Forest Pharmaceuticals, the company that manufactured Armour for decades ran in to regulatory issues and was recently acquired by a succession of larger pharmaceutical companies, the latest being Allergan. Meanwhile, the public continues to demand access to this medication many thousands swear by as the best treatment for hypothyroidism.

Users of Armour have noticed that the price of the medication is increasing steadily. Some are paying three times what they did a few years ago. There is no restriction on what a pharmaceutical company can charge for a medication and within the past years companies such as Turing Pharmaceuticals have tested the limits of just how outrageous the cost increases can be. We therefore initiated a local and on-line petition, to place Allergan on notice that there exists a large and very active advocacy group insisting on continued fair access to this medication. Combining both the on-line and hard copies of signatures,  I am proud to say that as of today we have surpassed our goal of 500 signatures to support this effort.

The next step is to present the petition to the corporate leadership of Allergan in such a way as the voices of those who need the medication most will be heard. There is still time to add your name and comments to the on-line petition at ipetitions.com.

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How the Sunshine Act Will Save You Money


By Gary Pepper, M.D.

Offering Promotional Money

Have you noticed that medication costs are skyrocketing? Even if you don’t take medication these higher costs are passed along to you in your health insurance premiums. The recently enacted Sunshine Act will combat these economic forces but in ways you may not realize. The legislation requires pharmaceutical companies to report all payments made to doctors. Physicians receiving substantial amounts of money from these companies include “thought leaders” who are sponsored by the drug companies to lecture the nation’s doctors on newly approved medications. Continue reading

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Pharmacies Label Armour Thyroid “Illegal” and Issue Therapeutic Warning


 

by Gary Pepper, M.D.http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-images-danger-sign-skull-symbol-image31277139

Early in May 2014 a patient being treated with Armour Thyroid (desiccated thyroid) for hypothyroidism reported that her pharmacy service would not refill her prescription for Armour Thyroid because it was an “illegal” drug. We were both very distressed to learn of this, but for different reasons. My patient was rightfully concerned that she might be receiving a wildly inappropriate medication, while I was concerned that I might not be able to prescribe a medication I knew to be extremely helpful and safe. Continue reading

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FDA to Weight Loss Drug Developers: “Drop Dead!!”


In just the last few months the FDA shot down applications from three new weight loss drugs
and removed one from the market that was previously approved. A month ago, based on
analysis of these actions, I predicted it will take 10 years for a new weight loss drug to be
approved by the FDA
. The latest action by the FDA makes me more confident than ever, in this
prediction.

A sensational action by the FDA to cripple development of new weight loss drugs came
about two weeks ago. The FDA denied approval to the weight loss drug candidate Contrave,
a combination of two medications. Both of the drugs in the combination pill are presently in
use and were FDA approved decades ago for indications other then weight loss. One of the
drugs Naltrexone, is used to treat opiate drug overdoses and the other bupropion HCL is used
to treat depression. Given the long history of safety of both drugs it would seem surprising
the FDA would reject the combination of these drugs on grounds of safety concerns, which
was what happened. Making the FDA rejection even more astounding is that just a month
before, a majority of members of the FDA’s own Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory
Committee, gave a thumbs-up to Contrave. In almost all previous instances where the Advisory
Committee gives their green light to a new drug candidate, the FDA has followed through with
an approval. I can hardly imagine a clearer way for the FDA to say “Drop Dead!!” to all those
seeking to get approval for a new weight loss medication.

Michael Narachi, CEO of Orexigen the maker of Contrave, is quoted as saying he “was
surprised and extremely disappointed with the agency’s (FDA’s) request”, a request which
essentially ended any chance of getting approval for his company’s weight loss drug. My advice
Michael, is to move on with your company and find another drug class to work on. Maybe
something to smooth away skin wrinkles or relieve constipation. I’m sure you will have a lot
more success. In the meanwhile, the epidemic of diabetes type 2, cardiovascular disease, and
disabilities due to degenerative joint disease, all related to obesity, marches on.

A final note of advice to investors in the medical field. I would spend my money on a psychiatrist
before investing money in companies conducting research on weight loss medication, since you
won’t see a penny from your investment for ten plus years.

Gary Pepper, M.D.
Editor-in-Chief, Metabolism.com

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Dangerous Weight Loss Programs for Diabetics


A few days ago I was concluding a visit with a patient with thyroid disease, while her diabetic
husband, also my patient, looked on. They are a pleasant older couple I have known for
years, who are devotedly helping each other stay healthy. As they were leaving the exam room the
wife apologetically turned the subject to her husband mentioning he was having almost
daily “episodes” of weakness and confusion. “I hadn’t changed his diabetic medication recently
so why should his blood sugar be an problem now”, I thought. A number of other unpleasant
possibilities immediately occurred to me. I inquired about signs of a possible stroke or heart
condition. If these other angles were unproductive I faced the choice of sending him to the
hospital for an evaluation. We quickly ran through a routine systems review. He had lost 10
lbs in the past month, the wife mentioned. “Oh, no, cancer” , was my first thought. His wife
explained that as a New Year’s resolution he enrolled in a commercial weight loss program for
diabetics. With relief, I knew we had the explanation of his disturbing new symptoms.

Most of my diabetic patients are on medication since they are unable to maintain good glucose
control with diet and exercise only. If they succeed however, in achieving weight loss then the
diabetes medication must be reduced to prevent undesirable hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).
Hypoglycemia is potentially dangerous because the brain cannot function properly resulting in
abnormal behavior, loss of muscle control and even unconsciousness. Imagine this occurring
while behind the wheel? Down here in Florida this is all too common.

Many commercial weight loss programs have started targeting Type 2 diabetics (adult onset)
with their TV ads. These programs are generally administered by people without any medical
background. They cannot advise medication changes (not that you would want them to) without
breaking the law by practicing medicine without a license. The result, as with my patient, is the
development of potentially serious complications of hypoglycemia.

In a previous blog http://www.metabolism.com/2010/10/17/injured-diabetic-diet , I worried that this type of problem could develop with commercial weight loss programs. I didn’t expect to see evidence of it so soon and in my own exam room. If my patient’s wife didn’t stop and mention his new symptoms at the last moment
that day, I imagine a far worse outcome for her husband was possible.

Gary Pepper, M.D.
Editor-in-Chief, metabolism.com

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