Tag Archives: crisis

LA Falls Through a Crack in Our Health Care System and Finds Armour Shortage Crisis


LA lives in rural America and has no health insurance. After 30 years of effective therapy with Armour Thyroid she is unable to obtain this medication any longer. Her story is a sad reminder of just how far we need to go to provide meaningful health care to the citizens of this country.

LA tells her story like it is:

I knew nothing about this problem of non-availability of Armour Thyroid. I have been on Armour since 1978 and it has worked just fine. I had my annual prescription renewal in June and because I do not have insurance, I was able to get 200 pills at a time for a price break. I take 3 60 mg tablets a day and have been on this dosage for about 6 years, up from a previous dosage of 2 60 mg tablets. Today, 4 Nov 09, I went to pick up a refill that I called in a week ago. I was informed at the pharmacy that Armour Thyroid is no longer being made. Period. I took my last pills on 2 November so I have no medication at all. I have a call in to my doctor but he has not yet returned that call. We contemplated a switch to Synthroid a couple of years ago (for a variety of reasons, none of which are relevant here) but the doctor said it could be a very slow process of finding out exactly what dosage of synthetic hormone would adequately replace the natural Armour. At that time I had insurance that would have covered the lab tests required to determine the proper dosage. I am now without insurance due to the death of my spouse, and because of the hypothyroidism I am unable to obtain health insurance that is even remotely affordable. Therefore I can’t afford all the tests, all the doctor visits, all the rest of the hoopla that woudl go with switching medication. I’ve been fortunate so far that I’ve been able to keep my same doctor, and that he gives me a bit of a break paying cash for my once-a-year-visit, but he’s 60 miles away and I can’t even afford the trips back and forth if I have to start “nudging” a new medication. It’s bad enough to be without the medication for a while, but to think that it will never be available again? I honestly don’t know what to do.

I knew nothing about this problem of non-availability of Armour Thyroid. I have been on Armour since 1978 and it has worked just fine. I had my annual prescription renewal in June and because I do not have insurance, I was able to get 200 pills at a time for a price break. I take 3 60 mg tablets a day and have been on this dosage for about 6 years, up from a previous dosage of 2 60 mg tablets. Today, 4 Nov 09, I went to pick up a refill that I called in a week ago. I was informed at the pharmacy that Armour Thyroid is no longer being made. Period. I took my last pills on 2 November so I have no medication at all. I have a call in to my doctor but he has not yet returned that call. We contemplated a switch to Synthroid a couple of years ago (for a variety of reasons, none of which are relevant here) but the doctor said it could be a very slow process of finding out exactly what dosage of synthetic hormone would adequately replace the natural Armour. At that time I had insurance that would have covered the lab tests required to determine the proper dosage. I am now without insurance due to the death of my spouse, and because of the hypothyroidism I am unable to obtain health insurance that is even remotely affordable. Therefore I can’t afford all the tests, all the doctor visits, all the rest of the hoopla that woudl go with switching medication. I’ve been fortunate so far that I’ve been able to keep my same doctor, and that he gives me a bit of a break paying cash for my once-a-year-visit, but he’s 60 miles away and I can’t even afford the trips back and forth if I have to start “nudging” a new medication. It’s bad enough to be without the medication for a while, but to think that it will never be available again? I honestly don’t know what to do.
LAWHilton@yahoo.com
LA
1

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Armour Crisis Creates New Alliances


Good things can develop during a crisis situation. For me it was the eye opening experience I had this week by participating in The Thyroid Patient Community Call. The Thyroid Patient Community Call is a group internet telephone call hosted by Janie Bowthorpe, author of Stop The Thyroid Madness. During the 90 minute session I was able to interact with dozens of callers as well as Janie herself. Needless to say, Janie’s audience is mostly individuals who are deeply committed to maintaining Armour Thyroid as a treatment option and who are equally angry with the field of Endocrinology which backs the ban on dessicated thyroid hormone. I knew this audience wanted answers to some very tough and troubling questions. For a few days before the call I needed to review for myself just how this crisis developed, and how I became a lightning rod for the growing controversies. I believe this process was necessary and therapeutic.

Being a strong advocate of t4 plus t3 therapy and of Armour Thyroid, I was in sync with most of the topics being discussed on the call. What was hard for me was hearing the out pouring of stories describing how endocrinologists had alienated (infuriated) so many thyroid patients. How to explain but not excuse the inflexibility, wrong headedness and arrogance of a whole field of medicine on a topic central to its mission, my own field for the past 25 years? My head still hurts thinking about it. For those wanting to hear how this played out can visit Talkshoe.com which hosts these shows and follow the instructions for listening to past episodes of Janie’s show. Perhaps Janie can give more specific instructions by posting them here.

I came away from Janie’s session with a firm recognition that the field of Endocrinology is in serious need of a make-over. Imagine a Democrat walking into a room full of staunch Republicans and asking everyone to join him in a sensitivity training program. It is a lonely job.

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Tina Sends the NY Times a Heads Up Regarding the Armour Crisis


Tina has raised her pen (actually her keyboard) to bring greater visibility to the Armour Thyroid crisis. Tina addressed her comments to one of the editors at the NY Times who actually appears to have taken this seriously and passed the email on upward. Thank you Tina, from me and those who are struggling with this unwarranted interruption in their medical treatment.

Here is the email sent by Tina to the NY Times Editor

Dear Ms. Kolata: I am writing in regard to recent restrictions on the availability of alternative, though highly effective, medications for hypothyroidism. Dessicated thyroid generics (made from the thyroid glands of pigs), known as Armour or NatureThroid, help thousands of people who suffer from low-functioning thyroids. I was on Synthroid, a synthetic thyroid medication, for years, but still suffered from symptoms. It was only when I began using NatureThroid, which treats all four of the hormone levels affected by the thyroid (vs. Synthoid, which only treats one), that my symptoms cleared up. I can’t tell you what a relief it is to no longer feel agitated and inexplicably moody, nor to have my hair falling out, my skin dry, etc. But it is becoming harder and harder to find dessicated thyroid generics. Armour, which has been around for about 50 years, is virtually out of business. Apparently the shortage has to do with FDA documentation requirements (which is odd; why now?)!
. Meanwhile, the American Academy of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) is backing Synthroid, which makes big money for its manufacturers (i.e., Abbott Laboratories). I hope this captures your interest. I don’t know what I, or thousands of others who have found relief with dessicated thyroid generics, will do if they are no longer available. If you would like more information, it may be helpful to go to http://www.metabolism.com. Thank you very much for your attention, Tina Montalvo West Palm Beach, FL

ARTICLE REFERENCED (if any):
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