Category Archives: thyroid

Make Your Opinion Count About Treatment Options for Hypothyroidism


Here is a rare opportunity to let the leadership in endocrinology know how you feel about treatment options for hypothyroidism. The American Thyroid Association is asking all those being treated for hypothyroidism to complete a simple questionnaire which will provide feedback regarding your level of satisfaction with present options for treatment of hypothyroidism. If you want to have your opinion counted log on to the following site and complete the survey!

If the link above doesn’t work copy and paste the following URL into your browser https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hypothyroidpatientsurvey

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Petition to Protect Armour Thyroid Surpasses Goal


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“I have been on Armour Thyroid for 15 years and it has changed my life. For three years prior I was on synthetic thyroid medication and I felt horrible. My doctor even tried a medication that was specifically for T4 so I could get what I was missing. I was having such horrible migraines. Now I am doing so much better. I know how physically traumatic it is to adjust thyroid medication or to go without it and it can be life threatening for certain individuals. Like myself. People are individuals not objects and they have different reactions to some medications. There are a group of people who desperately need to continue taking Armour please do not substitute the ingredients or take it off the market. I feel the adjustments that have been made in the medication since Armour was taken off of the market for almost a year. I had to resort to buying my medication from Canada!

Quote from Kathleen, a signer of the petition to Ensure Continued Supply of Armour; Read over 125 comments from other Armour supporters at ipetitions.com

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Armour Thyroid, the most popular form of desiccated thyroid hormone replacement in the U.S., has been the center of controversy for decades in the medical community. Despite over 100 years of successful use, the major endocrine specialty organization in the U.S. called for a prohibition on its use. Medicare dropped its coverage of this medication in 2008.  Forest Pharmaceuticals, the company that manufactured Armour for decades ran in to regulatory issues and was recently acquired by a succession of larger pharmaceutical companies, the latest being Allergan. Meanwhile, the public continues to demand access to this medication many thousands swear by as the best treatment for hypothyroidism.

Users of Armour have noticed that the price of the medication is increasing steadily. Some are paying three times what they did a few years ago. There is no restriction on what a pharmaceutical company can charge for a medication and within the past years companies such as Turing Pharmaceuticals have tested the limits of just how outrageous the cost increases can be. We therefore initiated a local and on-line petition, to place Allergan on notice that there exists a large and very active advocacy group insisting on continued fair access to this medication. Combining both the on-line and hard copies of signatures,  I am proud to say that as of today we have surpassed our goal of 500 signatures to support this effort.

The next step is to present the petition to the corporate leadership of Allergan in such a way as the voices of those who need the medication most will be heard. There is still time to add your name and comments to the on-line petition at ipetitions.com.

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Which Pesticides Create Precancerous Changes in Thyroid Cells?


pesticidesBy Gary Pepper, M.D.
Last week I posted a few highlights from the just concluded International Thyroid Congress. One of the research papers presented at the meeting generated particular concern. Endocrinologists and scientists at UCLA Medical Center led by Dr. Jerome Hershman investigated the potential for pesticides to damage the DNA of thyroid cells. The group focused on double strand breaks, the type of damage that could eventually lead to cancer. This is a particularly relevant point due to the explosion in newly diagnosed thyroid cancers being reported in many areas of the world. The increase is likely related, at least in part, to improved diagnostic techniques for thyroid cancer but could also represent environmental influences. Continue reading

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Highlights of the 2015 International Thyroid Congress


Update from the 15th International Thyroid Congress, Orlando Florida, October, 2015
By Gary Pepper, M.D.
Welcome     I just returned from Orlando, Florida, where I attended the 15th International Thyroid Congress and want to provide a report of my experience, to readers of metabolism.com. This was truly an international event with an estimated 50% of the attendees from outside the U.S. Organizers of this event describe it as, “Renowned experts in thyroid function and biology, diagnosis and management of thyroid disease, and novel therapies for treating thyroid cancer are gathering at the 15th International Thyroid Congress (ITC) to present, discuss, and debate the latest advances in thyroidology. Held every five years, the ITC is a collaborative meeting of the four world thyroid associations; the ATA (American Thyroid Association), Asia-Oceania Thyroid Association (AOTA), European Thyroid Association (ETA), and Latin American Thyroid Society (LATS).”
I was particularly excited to be attending this conference this year since my colleagues, Drs. Paul Cassanova and Kathryn Reynolds and I were presenting our study on the use of combination T3 plus T4 for the treatment of underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism).
Here are some papers I found to be of particular interest; Continue reading

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Medical Specialists Fail to Sanction Treatment for Hypothyroidism Preferred by Patients


Why Patients Aren’t Receiving the Most Effective Treatment for Hypothyroidism
By Gary Pepper, M.D.

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For the past 3 to 4 decades endocrinologists worldwide have adhered to the belief that only synthetic T4 (the most abundant of 4 thyroid hormones produced by the thyroid) is appropriate therapy for a sluggish thyroid even though it is known that a substantial number of those treated with T4 only continue to suffer from persistent symptoms of the disease. This may be because under normal conditions the thyroid produces two principle hormones T4 and T3. In 2013 an NIH study showed that 50% of those with hypothyroidism preferred treatment which includes T3 and our group reported that 78% of a subgroup of patients preferred T3 containing medication to treat hypothyroidism . Continue reading

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National Organizations Fail to Recognize New Approach for Treatment of Hypothyroidism


The 2013 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American Thyroid Association reiterated their long standing opinion that only a single hormone, T4 (Synthroid, levothyroxine) is advised for treatment of  hypothyroidism. These key organizations

Continue reading

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Slow Acceptance by Doctors of Combination Treatment for Hypothyroidism


Mainstream endocrinologists seem to be moving grudgingly toward acceptance of combination T4 plus T3 therapy for hypothyroidism. A great example of the mixed feelings harbored by endocrinologists in this regard is the title of a recent editorial, “ Combo (treatment) a Last Resort for Hypothyroidism” . Although the author, Dr. Bruce Jancin of the University of Colorado, recognized the value of combination T4 plus T3 therapy, he did so with the least possible enthusiasm. In his article the doctor acknowledged the weakness of scientific studies showing negative results with combination therapy and pointed out the findings of the Watts Study which provides a genetic rationale for why some people need to have T3 added to T4 to return to proper thyroid hormone balance. Continue reading

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Richard Faces Frustration Finding Treatment for Hypothyroidism After Thyroid Cancer


I thought Richards comments about the battle he faces getting treatment for hypothyroidism after having his thyroid removed for cancer, would be of interest to many readers at metabolism.com.
Richard writes:

I recently ordered Thyroid-S on Amazon.com and after all the research and apparently good results I have found online, I think I made the right choice. I had my thyroid removed because of cancer in 2005, took Cytomel at first, felt great, told to stop cytomel and start Levothyroxine, felt horrible. Two months out(125mcg) TSH was 43.0, increased dose to 137mcg wait another 2 months, TSH was 31.0 Finally told to take 200mcg and TSH started to come down. It took about 6 months to get my TSH where they wanted it and for the side effects I was given all types of medications. Continue reading

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Eric, Metabolism.com member, explains why T4 only doesn’t work


A long time member of metabolism.com, Eric Pritchard, has been a determined critic of “T4 only” treatment of hypothyroidism.  In his latest comment Eric shows that scientists were aware of the inadequacy of “T4 only” treatment since 1947!  I wanted to give everyone a chance to read his comment so I am posting to the main blog. Thanks again for your insight Eric.

Eric writes:

Endocrinologists have a hard time with the symptoms of hypothyroidism in the same sort of way that New York City folks believing that there is anything worthwhile west of the Hudson River. However, there are very relevant functions to the thyroid hormone effectiveness that exist beyond the boundaries of the classical endocrine system. This potential was given initial credence by Drs. Kirk and Kvroning in 1947 when they published a note saying that not all patients’ symptoms were managed by thyroxine (T4). This was collaborated in 1954 by Dr. Means. Drs. Gross and Pitt-Rivers discovered triiodothyronine (T3) and found it far more active than T4, which is now called a pro-hormone. The concept of euthyroid (your thyroid is OK) hypometabolism (but you are dragging anyway) was demonstrated by Dr. Goldberg in 1960. Drs. Refetoff and Braverman, circa 1970, discovered the connections between the thyroid gland and symptom producing cells, namely the cellular reception of hormones and the conversion of T4 to T3 outside of the endocrine system, which produces 80% of the body’s requirement for the active hormone, T3.

Another issue that is dismissed is the necessity of supporting chemistry to function properly. For example, every thyroid hormone replacement counter-indicates is use if the adrenals are insufficient.

So there is far more going on than endocrinology is willing to promote. That is why there are 1.7 million patients suffering in spite of T4 therapy. That is why there are still more patients suffering from false negative diagnoses for the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

 

 

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