Monthly Archives: March 2012

Eric, Metabolism.com member, explains why T4 only doesn’t work


A long time member of metabolism.com, Eric Pritchard, has been a determined critic of “T4 only” treatment of hypothyroidism.  In his latest comment Eric shows that scientists were aware of the inadequacy of “T4 only” treatment since 1947!  I wanted to give everyone a chance to read his comment so I am posting to the main blog. Thanks again for your insight Eric.

Eric writes:

Endocrinologists have a hard time with the symptoms of hypothyroidism in the same sort of way that New York City folks believing that there is anything worthwhile west of the Hudson River. However, there are very relevant functions to the thyroid hormone effectiveness that exist beyond the boundaries of the classical endocrine system. This potential was given initial credence by Drs. Kirk and Kvroning in 1947 when they published a note saying that not all patients’ symptoms were managed by thyroxine (T4). This was collaborated in 1954 by Dr. Means. Drs. Gross and Pitt-Rivers discovered triiodothyronine (T3) and found it far more active than T4, which is now called a pro-hormone. The concept of euthyroid (your thyroid is OK) hypometabolism (but you are dragging anyway) was demonstrated by Dr. Goldberg in 1960. Drs. Refetoff and Braverman, circa 1970, discovered the connections between the thyroid gland and symptom producing cells, namely the cellular reception of hormones and the conversion of T4 to T3 outside of the endocrine system, which produces 80% of the body’s requirement for the active hormone, T3.

Another issue that is dismissed is the necessity of supporting chemistry to function properly. For example, every thyroid hormone replacement counter-indicates is use if the adrenals are insufficient.

So there is far more going on than endocrinology is willing to promote. That is why there are 1.7 million patients suffering in spite of T4 therapy. That is why there are still more patients suffering from false negative diagnoses for the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

 

 

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Coconut Milk as Health Food? You’ve Got to Be Kidding.


Much as has been said recently about the health benefits of coconut milk and coconut oil. Coconut milk is a white liquid mixture of water and the white “flesh” of the coconut and is considered a more diluted form of coconut oil a thick clear liquid. Coconut extracts have been used in commercial food products, non-dairy creamers and cooking for many years but lately there has been a burst of publicity for coconut oil and milk as a new form of health-food with beneficial properties including increasing energy, preventing cancer and speeding weight loss.  I have seen it being added to ice cream and even bottled water. I want to sound a note of warning here.

 

Most physicians and nutritionists will advise against having too much fat in the diet for a number of reasons. First, and most obvious, fats have lots of calories. In addition dietary fat can increase the bad cholesterol (LDL) content of the blood leading to increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Among the different kinds of fat that raise LDL the worst are the saturated fats. One tablespoon of coconut oil contains about 120 calories with about 90% of the coconut oil being saturated fat.  In fact the saturated fat, palmitic acid, takes its name from the plant that produces coconuts, the palm tree. Compare this to the fat in dark chocolate which is 30% oleic acid, the healthy monounsaturated fat found in olive oil.

 

Oils which are far more beneficial for preparing foods are unsaturated fats including the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. I like canola, safflower and olive oil due to their high content of these healthier fats.

 

Coconut oil has many other applications which are useful outside the body. It can be used as a diesel fuel, deodorant, insect repellent, to make soap, and as a moisturizer for hair and skin.  My advice is to think twice however, before supplementing your diet with it.

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