Monthly Archives: April 2010

Gastric Bypass- A not-so-quick solution.


Hi,  just wanted to open up the discussion about gastric bypass from the perspective of a nutritionist.  Maintenance of a healthy weight, and HEALTHY LEAN BODY MASS is absolutely essential to our overall health and well being.  That goes for our biological, biochemical, social and psychological health.  Many people strive to achieve a healthy weight but is weight loss at any cost worth it?  There are cases where the weight loss becomes necessary to control blood pressure and blood glucose.  There are cases when gastric bypass may be a last option but it should be considered a last option after a 6 month trial of HEALTHY NUTRITION INTERVENTION and a reasonable activity schedule has been tried.  It can take at least 6 months to reprogram good habits into a person’s life when nutritionally poor habits have been dominant for most of their lives.

The main issues with gastric bypass revolve around the fact that one can easily return to eating unhealthy foods, just in small portions and the fact that normal digestion and assimilation is disrupted.  Without adequate hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach proteins won’t get digested properly and can putrefy and cause discomfort and reflux.  Without adequate HCl bad bacteria like H.Pylori won’t be killed off, minerals won’t be extracted from food and the small intestine won’t receive the proper signal to produce digestive enzymes.  Also, following gastric bypass the carrier for vitamin B12 is not produced efficiently and absorption is compromised.  Sublingual methylcobalamin should then be taken on a regular basis along with a full spectrum multivitamin/mineral supplement.

SO, maybe this isn’t such a quick note but it is an important one!  A HEALTHY DIET and REGULAR EXERCISE can’t be beat!

And as always,

Consider having an individualized nutrition consultation!

http://www.metabolism.com/beth-ellen-diluglio/

Beth Ellen DiLuglio, MS, RD, CNSD, CCN, LD/N

In regards to this reply please read the our terms of service at:http://www.metabolism.com/legal_disclaimer/

Share this post

What is My Correct Thyroid Dose?


Lots of members at metabolism.com with hypothyroidism ask what is their correct thyroid hormone dosage. For those who are still confused I am posting the latest Q and A addressing this issue.

Member ecchho received radioactive iodine for hyperthyroidism (over-active thyroid) and as commonly happens, developed hypothyroidism (under-active thyroid). Despite t4 levels which appear to be normal symptoms persist, so ecchho inquires about ways of dealing with this common problem.

Here is the Q and A regarding ecchho’s post:

Hi Dr. Pepper:

I had Graves disease at 23 and then had RAI at 28 and have been on synthroid for 18 years. I did try ARmour once, but I found it had too much t3 (I think the pig’s ratio of t4 to t3 is much more potent than humans) and I actually had a real hard time regulating. I don’t have a thyroid anymore, and I take 225 synthroid. i still suffer a bit with impossible weight loss (despite running, dieting, etc) and some depression that feels quite hormonal at times. My dr. brought up adding t3 last visit and tested me, and then said, oh, you don’t need any xtra t3, you seem to be converting fine.
what are the levels that the t3 should be, and is this free t3 or t3? thanks.

My reply to Ecchho’s post:

Your question regarding the correct level for thyroid functions, is frequently raised on this website. I would respond to your question with this question, ” What is the correct shoe size?” Obviously, the answer is, whatever shoe size fits best. Similarly with thyroid function, everyone has a different “comfort zone” where their body functions best. That is their “correct” thyroid hormone level. You also refer to a t4 to t3 ratio for pigs versus humans. These ratio’s are averages of several hundred individuals (human or pig)and do not apply to any particular individual. Some people function better at a t3 to t4 ratio which is higher than the average. As pointed out in my article,http://www.metabolism.com/2009/11/07/breakthrough-discovery-thyroid-hormone-therapy-part-2/ , there is recent evidence that due to genetic differences, a percentage of the population does not convert t4 to t3 efficiently and therefore are likely to require t3 supplementation when treated for hypothyroidism.

Rather than spend the money for genetic testing to discover whether the genes for conversion of t4 to t3 are abnormal, some doctors recommend simply adding an appropriate dose of t3 to the standard t4 (levothyoxine)treatment and following the patient for improvement in clinical symptoms. You might want to consider discussing this approach with your doctor.

Gary Pepper, M.D

Share this post

Diet Success May Be Genetic


Diet Success May be Genetic

A few years ago the book, Eat Right for Your (Blood) Type, was published by Dr. Peter D’Adamo with the premise that our present day nutritional needs are dependent on the types of food available to our genetic ancestors. For example, if your ancient ancestors evolved in a region of the world where protein was plentiful, then your body now requires a protein rich diet to stay healthy. According to the author your blood “type” is the clue to determining your nutritional heritage and your ideal diet type. I was never convinced of the usefulness of this blood type theory but agree that genetics strongly influences the way an individual stores fat and what constitutes their optimal nutritional requirements.

Along these lines recent research points to a connection between success with various weight loss diets and genetic differences between individuals. This was the conclusion of a study known as the A to Z Weight Loss Study. This study compared the results of 300 women who followed one of four possible diets ranging from those low in carbs (Adkins diet) to those low in fats (Ornish diet) to those high in protein (Zone diet). The women were then screened for genetic differences in specific genes that control fat metabolism.

Found was that some participants needed low carbs to lose weight while others required a diet low in fat to achieve weight loss. Analysis of the fat metabolizing genes showed that a specific favorable genetic profile was associated with up to a 6 fold increase in the amount of weight loss achieved with a particular diet. A participant was much more likely to lose weight if they were on the diet that harmonized with their particular genetic type.

How can you tell in advance if you are a carb sensitive or a fat sensitive dieter? For those with access to these experimental genetic tests (conducted by Interleukin Genetics) you could conceivable get the information you need. For the rest of us, starting with one type of diet and switching to the other type if weight loss isn’t achieved seems like a common sense approach.

Gary Pepper, M.D.
Editor-in-Chief, Metabolism.com

Share this post

Sandy Shares Her Thoughts on Ways to Prevent Diabetes


Occasionally, at Metabolism.com, we publish articles sent to us by our members. Here is a contribution by Sandy Harris explaining why maple syrup may possess surprising health benefits. Among the benefits Sandy highlights is a possible link to prevention of diabetes. Metabolism.com welcomes your thoughts on these issues so feel free to post a comment at the bottom of her article.

Sandy writes:

Little Known Ways to Prevent Diabetes with Maple Syrup by Sandy Harris; Guest Writer for Metabolism.com

Are you looking for a natural solution to reduce the risk of diabetes and slow down the growth of cancer cells?
Your search is probably over because recent studies have shown that maple syrup holds the key to these problems.US researchers have found that maple syrup has the ability to substantially decrease the risk of diabetes. The syrup also showed great potential in slowing down the growth of cancerous cells. Maple syrup has thirteen active antioxidant substances.
These antioxidants were previously unknown but were discovered only recently. Because of these antioxidants, researchers have firmed up that maple syrup has a great potential in fighting cancer growth, diabetes, and infections.

Maple Syrup as an Anti Diabetic Food

Considerable amounts of the phytohormone, abscisic acid, are found in maple syrup. This acid is a powerful defense against diabetes and metabolic syndrome, because it encourages the release of insulin through pancreatic cells and enhances fat cells’ sensitivity to insulin. Seeram revealed the results of his tests on Canadian maple syrup during the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco.

Maple Syrup as Your Best Chance against Cancer

A recent study by researchers in Quebec showed that maple syrup has the ability to slow down the growth of cancerous cells. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The study was an attempt to test the capability of maple syrup in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells.
The researchers proved that maple syrup is effective against cancer. More specifically, the syrup can significantly slow down cancer growth in the brain, lungs, and prostate. However, the effect of maple syrup on breast cancer cells was less significant.
Better Than Other Anti Cancer Foods
Maple syrup can serve as your tasty alternative in fighting cancer and diabetes. There are many anti cancer foods today like blueberries, tomatoes, broccoli, and carrots. However, recent studies have shown that maple syrup is more effective against cancer compared to other anti cancer foods. Laboratory testing results also show that the syrup is more potent compared to the maple sap
.It is also ideal to use the pure dark syrup rather than the lighter syrup. Dark syrup has high color oxidation. This is the reason why darker maple syrup should be preferred. So if you want a better alternative to fight cancer and diabetes, then your favorite maple syrup is a good option.
Reference: Journal of medicinal food. 01/02/2010; ISSN: 1557-7600, OI: 10.1089/jmf.2009.0029
About the Author – Sandy Harris writes for the diabetic appetizer recipes blog , her personal hobby blog focused on tips to prevent, cure and manage diabetes using healthy snacks and recipes.

Disclaimer for Metabolism.com:
The author’s views do not necessarily reflect the views of Metabolism.com, and this website is not responsible for the research or accuracy of the statements in this article.

Share this post

Carol Reveals Her Weight Gain Secrets


Carol, a member of metabolism.com, recently posted her approach to healthy weight gain. I thought it was interesting enought to post on the main blog. My major concern with her advice is that some people are lactose intolerant and a diet high in dairy products as Carol outlines, could cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Many people are unaware they are lactose intolerant since this problem can develop later in life (20’s, 30’s 40’s). As a kid they could eat ice cream, cheese, drink milk without a problem but slowly they develop frequent heart burn, diarrhea, gas etc and fail to attribute it to dairy intake.

Anyway, here is Carol’s secret to weight gain:

Carol writes:

Ok, I found something that helps me to maintain what I have, but as yet I haven’t been able to actually gain any weight: Dairy products, lots of them, and don’t go for the lite or skim version – go for the gold. I have been going through about a gallon to a gallon and a half of soymilk (the one with the extra vanilla in it. Has about 190 calories per serving. Also I make sure to have yogurt every day and I put honey in and granola on top. Cheese and cracker snacks are good too. I have also find that if I do anything physical (walk the dog, work in the yard etc) I need to have a large heavy (but healthy) snack right after and sit quietly for a good 20 or 30 minutes. The key seems to be stay away from the junk food….for most it packs the calories on but for us it burns right through and you just end up not feeling good as your body doesn’t get what it needs.
Take heart – most of you that I am hearing from are much younger (I am 52, 5′5″ and 103 pounds) I have been battling this since I was a kid. I was always told after kids, age 40 etc it would get better – it didn’t for me, but maybe it will for you.

Share this post

Update on our Nutrition Consultation winner


Hi again.

Just wanted to update folks on Sally Anne’s progress, with her permission.  Since our exchange began on March 16th, Sally has lost 7 pounds and has been told she even looks thinner.  Eating frequently with adequate protein is an important step to boosting metabolism and curbing night time cravings.  She has started resistance training and is consuming more protein so she is maintaining lean body mass and losing fat tissue.  She has started a workout routine from home,  is taking targeted nutrition support supplements and has been developing menus based  on a 1200 Calorie balanced diet.  She no longer consumes products with the artificial sweetener sucralose and uses the natural sweetener stevia instead.   Sally is an excellent student, she’s quite motivated and is looking forward to having more energy to kayak and enjoy the summer.

Share this post

Watch Dr. G. Pepper and Beth Ellen DiLuglio on Youtube


We are initiating a series of talks on nutrition by our staff, on Youtube. Click on the video below (or cut and paste the URL into your browser) to access this informative first session featuring Beth Ellen and Dr. Pepper.

Your feedback will help us prepare our future programs, so feel free to post your thoughts about our video here or on Youtube!

Share this post

Expert Advice for Those Who Want to Gain Weight.


Yes, as we can see from so many posts here at Metabolism.com, some folks just can’t slow their metabolism down and keep their weight up! It is true some people just have a “high metabolism”… they burn up Calories like they were a fiery furnace. My professor at Columbia University’s College of Physician and Surgeons Institute of Human Nutrition was such an individual. He was tall and thin and took part in a study where he consumed an extra 6,000 Calories per day for 2 weeks and didn’t gain a pound! This can actually be frustrating for some people and needs to be addressed as seriously as the desire for weight loss is. No one wants to just gain adipose tissue (fat) either. Most people want to gain HEALTHY WEIGHT by increasing their lean body mass/muscle. A person’s total Calorie, protein, carbohydrate, fat and fluid needs depend on their height, weight, activity, gender, age, and yes, their metabolism! Metabolic rate can actually be measured by an indirect calorimetry machine. Once we know what your basal or resting metabolic rate is, we would factor in activity and other variables. It is always important to work on a weight gain program with a nutrition professional. Nutrition plans and supplementation should be developed by a professional so that you are not led astray and given misinformation. We have had inquiries about supplements such as L-carnitine and CLA for example. Always learn the basics about a supplement and see if it is really appropriate for YOU to use. I will answer quickly about L-carnitine because it is a popular supplement. Think of a CAR… it can carry things… CARnitine is like a little car that carries fatty acids across the cell membrane and into the mitochondria where they can be burned for fuel. We are able to produce carnitine ourselves and it is found in most animal based foods. However, some people may not produce enough and functional levels can be determined by a Spectracell test (see SpectraCell.com Comprehensive Nutritional Panel). Now, that is just a little Nutrition 101 for CARnitine… there is more where that came from, and as always,

Consider having an individualized consultation!
http://www.metabolism.com/beth-ellen-diluglio/

Beth Ellen DiLuglio, MS, RD, CNSD, CCN, LD/N
In regards to this reply please read the our terms of service at:http://www.metabolism.com/legal_disclaimer/

Share this post