KC offers advice on metabolism and smoking


KC has a lot of experience to share about how stopping smoking effects metabolism. (KC also has a lot of Bingo experience but don’t ask me how I know.) GPepper Editor-in -Chief

KC writes:

I’m a long-time (25+ years) smoker who has quit and re-started many times. My opinion’s based on my own experience, talking to friends who have quit, plus years of reading umpteen books, journals, websites, etc. Smoking obviously screws with your metabolism – but no one is sure exactly how. Expect to gain up to 10 pounds within the first 6 months after quitting. Gaining more than 10 pounds in that time probably indicates overeating. It takes your body about 1 year to re-adjust its metabolism. Accept the idea that you will likely gain a few short-term pounds after you quit; consider it a “symptom of recovery.” 10 pounds is not that big of a deal, though it certainly grabs your attention. After 1 year, your weight will slowly return to normal if you keep exercising and eating right. Managing the weight gets harder as you get older, so start NOW. Having said all that, I know people who have quit smoking and never gained an ounce, so hope for the best. Stay strong everyone, stay motivated, and Good Luck!!!

bingobastard@yahoo.com
KC

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  • Jan Pollard

    I quit smoking a year ago and I have gained over 40pds. I walk and I eat right and I just keep getting bigger; no matter what I do.

    What else is there besides fruits and vegetables and exercising?

  • Barry

    If you want to lose weight, you’ll have to increase the intensity of your exercise. Walking is a fine exercise for beginners, but after a while, you can progress to more challenging activities like running, weight training, jumping rope, swimming, etc. The harder you breathe, the more fat you will burn.

  • Hello there,

    As a Nutritionist and former smoker myself, I discovered that I stopped the smoking and simply transferred the need for nicotine onto other members of the Night Shade family. I craved tomatoes, potatoes, peppers etc — and each of these turned out to be a problem for my re-adjusting metabolism.

    Once I went through the process of elimination and figured out it was all of the Night Shade family that was causing the problem, I, and now many others, have successfully dealt with the weight gain and many other health issues as well.

    From my own personal clinical Nutrition experience I feel that there may in fact be some sort of ‘allergy’ or hyper sensitivity response built up from the smoking (or perhaps this is the original issue). We often crave the things we are sensitive too.

    All the very best,

    April Danann
    Ireland

  • Hello there,

    As a Nutritionist and former smoker myself, I discovered that I stopped the smoking and simply transferred the need for nicotine onto other members of the Night Shade family. I craved tomatoes, potatoes, peppers etc — and each of these turned out to be a problem for my re-adjusting metabolism.

    Once I went through the process of elimination and figured out it was all of the Night Shade family that was causing the problem, I, and now many others, have successfully dealt with the weight gain and many other health issues as well.

    From my own personal clinical Nutrition experience I feel that there may in fact be some sort of 'allergy' or hyper sensitivity response built up from the smoking (or perhaps this is the original issue). We often crave the things we are sensitive too.

    All the very best,

    April Danann
    Ireland

  • I really like and appreciate your post.Thanks Again. Really Great.